Sometimes, getting up above all the ‘noise’ is the best way to really see things in their proper perspective. Today’s post is in that spirit of Flyin’ High.

This segment from my husband’s Scientology Roots book (recently updated) I think is worth pulling out all by itself.

This is from his Chapter 9-2 Hubbard’s Lifelong Intelligence Career which covers roughly the time period of L. Ron Hubbard’s life from 1950 on.

Ready?

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1954

 

A CIA unit called Political Action Staff was created, which was under Kermit Kim Roosevelt jr.
Kim Roosevelt appointed Miles Copeland to head the unit but he was still serving overseas.
In the meantime, Kim Roosevelt appointed Bob Mandlestam to the unit and got him started.   126

Robert Mandelstam enlargeRobert Stanley Mandelstam

Mandlestam had observed that political leaders around the world were influenced by occult practitioners such as astrologers, mystics, and even voodoo magic. Mandlestam put into action a scheme he called “Occultism in High Places”. This was when he recruited Ron Hubbard to work for the CIA unit called Political Action Staff.

Kim Roosevelt had set my new unit in motion without me. He had told my first assistant, a bright and inventive young PhD named Bob Mandlestam, that he should get something started, anything that smacked at all of political action…

Bob eagerly put his imagination to work on some ideas he had been nursing since his university days. His first was what he called ‘occultism in high places’… a theory of political activism based on an impressively detailed study of ways in which leaders of the world based their judgements on one form or another of divine guidance.

…there was something called Moral Rearmament… an interdenominational politico-religious movement started by a nut named Frank Buchman.

What caught Bob’s eye was the social level at which the movement operated. It was aimed exclusively at leaders… the arrangement we made with Moral Rearmament gave us useful secret channels right into the minds of leaders not only in Africa and Asia but also in Europe.

When Bob made similar arrangements with Scientology, the brainchild of another nut, this one a science-fiction writer named Ron Hubbard, we were on our way to having a political action capability which would make… Bill Casey’s CIA seem trivial by comparison.

‘MRA will hit ’em high, and the Church of Scientology will hit ’em low!’  Bob liked to boast, and he was right.

If you cynics who read this think I’m kidding, put the thought out of your mind.

– Miles Copeland     126

Earlier in the year Hubbard had proclaimed that Scientology is not a religion.   214

Now that Scientology was working with the CIA in political actions, it was going to be presented as an occult religion.
On 4 August 1954 Hubbard sent out a mailing called Golden Dawn – it presented Scientology as a religion.  215
After Hubbard sent out the Golden Dawn flier he conducted a religious opinion poll in August 1954.   216

.
Miles Copeland was married to a woman who worked for Special Operations Executive (British intelligence) – Lorraine Adie. Copeland was in London during World War II where he became a lifelong anglophile (Brit lover).

The SOE conducted sabotage through political covert actions. It also carried out paramilitary operations.
The SOE was the British intelligence unit carrying out Operation Gladio, mostly using the CIA to do it.

The CIA acted together with the SOE in carrying out sabotage through political covert actions.
The CIA unit Political Action Staff served as a front for the British intelligence unit called SOE.
When Hubbard started working for Political Action Staff, he was working for both the SOE and the CIA.

Miles Copeland was the first member of the CIA to be officially designated a political action specialist.

Miles Copeland juniorMiles Copeland junior

Miles Copeland moved to Washington D.C. in July 1955 and took control of the CIA unit Political Action Staff.
Ron Hubbard immediately also moves to Washington D.C. and founds the Church of Scientology there.

On 21 July 1955 Ron Hubbard incorporated the Founding Church of Man’s Religion in Washington D.C.
In September 1955, he changed the name to Founding Church of Scientology.   179, 213

Miles Copeland said Scientology has a continuing arrangement with the CIA to conduct political action. 132

Those operations we inaugurated in the years 1955-7 are still secret… The ‘perfect’ political action operation is, by definition, uneventful. Nothing ‘happens’ in it. It is a continuing arrangement, neither a process nor a series of actions proceeding at a starting point and ending with a conclusion.

– Miles Copeland

.
Political Action includes various types of CIA covert operations. It includes financing for CIA covert operations, covert manipulation of a nation’s people and their leaders, social engineering, lobbying, propaganda, terrorizing, killing, coups, and giving support to CIA installed dictators and their cruel treatment of the people which includes human rights violations, torture and mass murder. Hubbard and other Scientologists have given support at one time or another for that entire list.

A large part of the financing for CIA covert operations is obtained from drug trafficking.
Scientologists have helped with that too.

Miles Copeland also said the CIA preferred working with a religious group that was so offbeat that anyone in the Agency who belongs to it may be fired as a security risk. “The CIA use of these groups should be entirely outside the diplomatic establishment, run independently of our embassies and consulates, and so managed that our diplomatic representatives can honestly disclaim responsibility for them”.  Miles said one way these groups are useful to the CIA is to smuggle anything into or out of a country.  217

* * *

.

And there you have it!

For you document-minded types out there, see the below.


 

References –

 

These are the references cited in the above segment.

126. The Game Player by Miles Copeland

Miles Copeland juniorMiles Copeland junior

Miles Copeland worked for the CIA for several decades. He said this about Hubbard and Scientology –

…we planted an agent in the Scientology cult who became a ‘clear’ under the tutelage of Ron Hubbard himself, and then demanded and got more and more ‘operation expenses’ to be turned over, in addition to his own life’s savings, to the cause of Dianetics.

Copeland headed a CIA unit called Political Action Staff. One of his assistants was Bob Mandlestam.

Miles Copeland says that Ron Hubbard and Scientology worked for the CIA Political Action Staff –

…there was something called Moral Rearmament… an interdenominational politico-religious movement started by a nut named Frank Buchman. It purported to deepen the spiritual life of its members, thereby inducing them to behave responsibly and altruistically in their public lives.

What caught Bob’s [Bob Mandlestam] eye was the social level at which the movement operated. It was aimed exclusively at leaders… the arrangement we made with Moral Rearmament gave us useful secret channels right into the minds of leaders not only in Africa and Asia but also in Europe.

When Bob made similar arrangements with Scientology, the brainchild of another nut, this one a science-fiction writer named Ron Hubbard, we were on our way to having a political action capability which would make… Bill Casey’s CIA seem trivial by comparison. ‘MRA will hit ’em high, and the Church of Scientology will hit ’em low!’ Bob liked to boast, and he was right.

Here are the pages in Copeland’s book that document the above statements by Copeland –

The Game Player by Miles Copeland_Page_1

The Game Player by Miles Copeland_Page_2

The Game Player by Miles Copeland_Page_3

The Game Player by Miles Copeland_Page_4

The Game Player by Miles Copeland_Page_5

The Game Player by Miles Copeland_Page_6

The Game Player by Miles Copeland_Page_7

CIA uses Scientology from The Game Player by Miles Copeland

132. Miles Copeland said the CIA arrangement with Scientology is continual.

scientology continuing arrangmnt CIA - The Game Player by Miles Copeland

 

179 and 213. This document shows Hubbard incorporated the Founding Church of Man’s Religion on 21 July 1955.
Two months later he changed its name to Founding Church of Scientology.

The document is from declassified FDA records.These records were publicly accessible because of a Muck Rock/FOIA request by R.M. Seibert (Anonlover). They can be found on CD #1, in Folder 3, letter from Hubbard on page 466.

Nov 16 1957 ron Hubbard to BBB Leland Mccartay Nov 16 1957 ron Hubbard to BBB Leland Mccartay 2 Nov 16 1957 ron Hubbard to BBB Leland Mccartay 3

214. Issue 24G, Journal of Scientology, January 1954 – Hubbard says scientology is NOT a religion.

JOS_24g_sop8c_jan_1954

Journal of Scientology Issue 24-G p 5 NOT a religion

215. Hubbard did this mailing called Golden Dawn on 4 August 1954. The flier portrays Scientology as a religion and a church for the first time. It is excellently documented by Caroline Letkeman (Gerry Armstrong). I have also combined these into an OCR’d PDF for easier use.

golden dawn issue 1-0a p 1 golden dawn issue 1-0a p 2 golden dawn issue 1-0a p 3 golden dawn issue 1-0a p 4

We know the date of the Golden Dawn flier by the discussion of it contained in a split-off group of Dianeticists who published a magazine called the Aberree  – The ABERREE SEPTEMBER 1954 Volume 1, Number 5

aberree_september_1943_golden_dawn_1

aberree golden dawn page 2

 

216. After Hubbard sent out the Golden Dawn flier mentioned in the previous reference above, he conducted a religious opinion poll in August 1954. Journal of Scientology issue 35g talks about that Religious Opinion Poll.

religious opinion poll in phoenix aug 1954 Journal of Scientology Issue 35-G Here’s a PDF of the page.

Text –

This is a review of the Religious Opinion Poll as made in the first part of August, 1954 in Phoenix. One hundred sixty-one addresses were contacted: sixty of these were not at home, or did not answer; thirty-one wouldn’t answer at all, or got started and then stopped the interview; which leaves us with about seventy people actually answering the questions of the poll. The exact  figures are available; this is a summary.

A majority said they had received the Golden Dawn and half of those who had received it read it. The total of people reading the mailing piece was 15%. The majority of these believed that it told them what Scientology was. They believed that every person should have the right to speak freely his views and opinions of religion.

They believed overwhelmingly that religion is directly connected with everyday livingness; They were emphatic in believing that religion and superstition are not the same. They believed overwhelmingly that Man has a soul, and, oddly enough, a considerable majority believed that Man is his soul. Almost all believed that Man’s soul can be saved. A considerable majority had studied religion and religious doctrines. Only six of the fifty believed there was no use in continuing a search for the soul. The majority believed a person had a right to his own life. A larger majority believed each person had a right to his own sanity, and an overwhelming majority believed that men had a right to their own ideas and their own goals. A vast majority believed that the Creed of the Church of Scientology, as given in the Golden Dawn, Issue l-OA was acceptable.

A very small majority believed that religion should not be used to control people, which means that something, less than half did believe that religion should be used·to control people. A very heavy majority believed that religion should be used to set Man free. An overwhelming majority believed that people should be open minded about religion. Almost as large a majority believed that a religious organization should make public its findings concerning Man’s soul. A considerable minority believed that all one had to do was have faith in order to solve his problems, while the majority believed that one had to have more than faith. An overwhelming majority believed in “a higher goal for Man.” A slight but distinct majority believed that Man only lives one life which means that almost as great a number believed that Man lived more than one life. In other words, almost, but not quite, fifty percent of those answering the poll believed that an individual lived several lives.

Fifty believed that God was all-powerful. None would say that He was not, and only one said that he didn’t know. A majority believed that a child should have the right to select his own religion. An overwhelming majority believed that Man had to suffer for his misdeeds.

The people were equally divided as to whether or not Man was basically sinful. A larger majority believed that a person could be truly religious without attending church. Thirty-six believed that there was going to be a Judgement Day. Five believed there was going to be no Judgement Day, and ten said they didn’t know. A startling majority said they believed the world was going to end. An overwhelming majority believed that a person had the right to leave his church and join another which offered more for his soul, and on the subject of what a minister should do professionally, an overwhelming majority believed that he should teach his Doctrines, that he should heal the suffering, that he should convert others to his Doctrines, and that he should follow in the footsteps of Christ.

Remembering that thirty-one people out of this hundred and sixty-one, when talked to-would not answer questions or stopped the interview, which is to say about one-third, and that these included all the Catholics contacted, who said they would not be able to read the Golden Dawn unless told they could do so by their priest; and remembering that this is a relatively small poll conducted in a country which has lots of space, and therefore greater freedom, we still find some very interesting data in this poll.

We find immediately that the Doctrines of Scientology are far from unacceptable to the general public. We find the majority believing that Man is his soul, and everyone believing that Man has a soul, except two lonely people who didn’t know, and we find these people easily separating the idea of going to church from the idea of being religious. We find them overwhelmingly in favor of religious freedom and we find that they believe that men should have a right to their own lives, their own sanity, their own goals, and in other words believe completely in self-determinism. They believe completely that a religious organization should make public its findings about the soul, and their general attitude toward religion is a sane and acceptable one which finds nothing wrong with religion or religious practices.

The most important thing about this poll is that the public concept of a minister, as to what his duties should be, do not fit the activities of the current Protestant and Catholic ministry. These people were of one accord in believing that a minister should teach his Doctrines, that he should heal the suffering, that he should follow in the footsteps of Christ. In other words, these people do look to the ministry to heal the suffering, even more than they look to other fields.

And then when we examine the New Testament we discover that Christ, to make a generalized statement, simply went out and healed and taught people to heal, and told people that they could be immortal, and it is this aspect of Christ, simply as described here, which has evidently brought him forward over two thousand years of rather definite misbehaviour on the part of religious organizations.

After a very careful examination of this poll, one would say very bluntly: Scientology fills the need of the people for a religion, which need is not, at this time being filled, since the general popular description of what a religion should be fits Scientology, and does not fit the existing churches, or the existing ministry, and that the public at large expects the minister to do exactly what a Scientologist would do, and therefore must be somewhat surprised when the ministry does not do—as it does not do—what a Scientologist can do.

Pending further polls on results in Operation Phoenix, one would tend to draw an early conclusion that people are sitting there waiting for a religion, and don’t, at the moment, have one, and will not have one unless we get busy.

217. Without Cloak and Dagger by Miles Copeland

Copeland said the CIA preferred working with a religious group that was so offbeat that anyone in the Agency who belongs to it may be fired as a security risk.

SPD – Special Projects Division, CIA.

.

Plain Text –

The SPD’s connections with international religious groups for purposes of aiding or supplementing espionage operations is almost as touchy an issue as its association with criminal rings.

To start with, Jewish and Catholic organizations are out. If it were learned that a case officer had lined up a Jewish or a Catholic organization for espionage purposes, half the agency would walk out. Contrary to some opinion, the CIA is definitely not a “WASP” organization; except for the units that deal with Middle East affairs, in which the Agency’s Jews prefer not to work, its percentages of Jews and Catholics are considerably higher than the national percentages.

Organizations stemming from other religions are fair game, however-or they were fair game until, one by one, many of them turned out to have fanatical adherents in the Agency.

For a while, Moral Re-Armament was believed to be a potentially valuable SPD asset. Then, just as the SPD was establishing contacts with Moral Re-Armament representatives it was learned that a deputy chief of one of the area divisions was a Moral ReArmer and would proceed to his Congressman, also a Moral Re-Armer, and blow the operation sky-high should it ever get off the ground. The same for Seventh-Day Adventists, Jehovah’s Witnesses, and half a dozen other religions with international followings.

“Before we tie into a religious group,” an SPD officer told me some time ago, “it’s got to be so offbeat that anyone in the Agency who belongs to it may be fired as a security risk – and that does not include the Holy Rollers.”

      On page 249 –

“The espionage organization, if we must have such a thing, should be entirely outside the diplomatic establishment, run independently of our embassies and consulates, and so managed that our diplomatic representatives can honestly disclaim responsibility for them”.

On page 274

One usefulness for the group is to “Smuggle anything into or out of the country-money, documents, equipment, a person “

Join the conversation! 2 Comments

  1. Hey Mike… recently taken an interest in Ingo Swann’s work… and noticed snippets of things about Ingo Swann being a scientologist.

    What is your take on Mr. Swanns interest? Exploration?

    Reply

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All that Spy Stuff, Historical Research

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